Infernalische Schenkel.

What is shown below is one of the very first jobs I did as a graphic designer. In fact I wasn’t even a designer at this point, I was still studying graphic design at FHS Dortmund, but used to work part time for a designer in Dortmund in order to earn some money to support my young family.

One of the main clients of this designer was Bauer Films, a distributor of porn movies. We used to create all their little black and white hard contrast ads for the cinema section in local newspapers for them, and this brochure shows a broad selection.

Infernalische Schenkel

Werbung für den Film “Infernalische Schenkel”.

The production of those ads was fairly easy, although quite time-consuming. The photos of the girls were mostly stolen from Playboy magazine and the headings done with Letraset. In order to add some excitement I painted jail bars in front of some of the hard contrast repros (“Wenn es Nacht wird im Lyzeum”) or added tear drops, drawn with a Rapidograph, to a headline rubbed down from Letraset’s Gill Sans Ultra Bold (“Feuchte Träume”).

Perhaps I should be embarrassed having worked on such an account, but in fact I’m not. Mind you, in the eighties I even worked on advertising for cigarette brands. In fact I wish I could do stuff like this nowadays – it was great, great fun. Especially the titles of those movies, like “Infernalische Schenkel” (“Infernal Thighs”) or “Invasion der Liebesdrohnen” (Invasion of the Love Drones) are just fantastic. They’re not doing them like those anymore.

However, I can always use the excuse “I was young and needed the money.”

Anyway, here’s the 6-page brochure from about 1980 in all its dubious glory:

Bauer film brochure title

Bauer film brochure title

Bauer film brochure page 2

Bauer film brochure page 2

Bauer film brochure page 3

Bauer film brochure page 3

Bauer film brochure page 4

Bauer film brochure page 4

Bauer film brochure page 5

Bauer film brochure page 5

Bauer film brochure back page

Bauer film brochure back page

A job bag/job number system with Evernote

Life as a graphic designer was always rather easy for me: I received a job from a client, finished it, sent the invoice and sooner or later another job would appear. As of lately though, I got lots of different jobs from one client, all from various department and various product managers and began slowly losing the plot. Have I invoiced this job? Has this job been approved? What’s with the job that started 3 weeks ago? Searching through long
e-mail threads with attached Word, PDF and PPT documents isn’t that much fun either. Clearly a job number system was needed.

There are, of course, dedicated database systems for ad agencies and graphic design studios available. However, they don’t come cheap and why buy yet some more software when I’ve got Evernote?

With a lot of trial and error I came up with a system that works perfectly well for my purposes. I’m sharing it here because it may as well suit your work flow; a basic knowledge of Evernote is required though – download the manual here.

I created two note templates in Evernote. The first one serves as a job bag.

The note template for the "Job Bag".

The note template for the “Job Bag”.

The note title consists of the job number and description of the job, followed by date, name of product manager, and, just for the sake of it, the job number again.

“Art:” shows, once the job is finished, the attachments – a low resolution PDF and the InDesign document. The space underneath is used for briefs from the client, e-mails and everything else that belongs to this particular job. This way I’ve got all the communication with the client within one easy searchable note and don’t have to browse through gazillions of e-mails.

This is what a “Job Bag” note looks like once a job is finished:

"Job Bag" linked to documents and filled with e-mails and further information etc.

“Job Bag” linked to documents and filled with e-mails and further information etc.

The second note template is used for the creation of a jobs list:

Note template for the creation of a list of jobs for a quick overview.

Note template for the creation of a list of jobs for a quick overview.

This gets copied and pasted into one note every time a new job is created. It’s for a list view of all ongoing jobs. Checkmarks show the status of each job and, most important of all, whether it’s been invoiced and paid. “Links:” points towards the job bag and possible additional documents, like branding guidelines. Depending on the number of jobs per month, I can create a new list either every month or every 3 months or could even keep a list on a yearly basis.

Here’s the list view:

The list gives a quick overview of the status of each job.

The list gives a quick overview of the status of each job.

At present this system works just perfect for my purposes. It can probably be extended or perhaps even simplified, but right now I don’t see any reason for this.

And now back to work.